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rhamphotheca:

Moving Back Home Together:

Rarest Native Animals Find Haven on Tribal Lands

by Nate Schweber

FORT BELKNAP AGENCY, Mont. — In the employee directory of the Fort Belknap Reservation, Bronc Speak Thunder’s title is buffalo wrangler.

In 2012, Mr. Speak Thunder drove a livestock trailer in a convoy from Yellowstone National Park that returned genetically pure bison to tribal land in northeastern Montana for the first time in 140 years. Mr. Speak Thunder, 32, is one of a growing number of younger Native Americans who are helping to restore native animals to tribal lands across the Northern Great Plains, in the Dakotas, Montana and parts of Nebraska.

They include people like Robert Goodman, an Oglala Lakota Sioux, who moved away from his reservation in the early 2000s and earned a degree in wildlife management. When he graduated in 2005, he could not find work in that field, so he took a job in construction in Rapid City, S.D…

(read more: NY Times)

photographs by Jonathan Proctor/Defenders of Wildlife

Source: rhamphotheca
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thatyellowvolvoguy:

theoldiebutgoodie:

1979 Chevrolet Camaro.

Awesome, love the action shot from inside

(via gm-nation)

Source: theoldiebutgoodie
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electricfuchsia:

YOU THOUGHT IT WAS DELIVERY, BUT IT WAS ME, DIOGIORNO!

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(via kazahayakudo)

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rhamphotheca:

Audubon Society of Portland, OR

While some bird species have started to leave Oregon for warmer climates, others will stay with us throughout the winter, including the red-breasted sapsucker (Sphyrapicus ruber). If you have questions about coexisting with woodpeckers like this lovely bird, we have some tips and tricks on our website.

Photograph by Scott Carpenter

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bemoretea:

Want to extend your dog days of summer?

Head to our Be More Tea Tumblr and tell us what you would do with an #ExtraSUNday for a chance to win one through 8/31. 

Source: bemoretea
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rhamphotheca:

A Northern Caracara (Caracara cheriway) searches for prey in the grass at the edge of the NABA National Butterfly Center in Mission, TX, USA.

(via:National Butterfly Center)

Source: rhamphotheca
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rhamphotheca:

Japan’s cherry blossom stone is a natural wonder

Meet the cherry blossom stone from Japan - one of the most striking natural rock formations in the world.

by Bec Crew

So-called because when you crack them open, their internal cross-sections look like tiny golden-pink flowers, cherry blossom stones (sakura ishi in Japanese) get their beautiful patterns from mica, which is a commonly found silicate mineral known for its shiny, light-reflecting surface. 

These flower patterns weren’t always made of mica. They started their existence as a complex matrix of six prism-shaped crystal deposits of a magnesium-iron-aluminium composite called cordierite, radiating out from a single dumbbell-shaped crystal made from a magnesium-aluminium-silicate composite called indialite in the centre. 

Hosted inside a fine-grained type of rock called a hornfels - formed underground around 100 million years ago by the intense heat of molten lava - cherry blossom stones underwent a second significant metamorphosis in their geological lifespan when they were exposed to a type of hot water called hydrothermal fluids

(read more: ScienceAlert! - Australia/NZ)

images: John Rakovan et al.

(via thecraftychemist)

Source: rhamphotheca